Wages being pushed down....

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Postby ShadowChaser » Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:38 pm

K-sey Complex wrote:
ShadowChaser wrote:
And is still working for $15. On top of that the $15 per tech is happy as pooh to have that $15 because his 19 classmates are still working at the carwash.



K-sey I think you and I exists in different worlds, mainly because of the big difference in cost of living, from MI to CA, and also because the difference in availability of all types of jobs.

I don't know a single tech that has ever been o can be happy at 15$ (unless you're 16). Just as it is nearly impossible for any tech from a 2 year college degree to have to work in a carwash ( unless you have a felony or something). I mean at the very least you become a medical assistant.

But I understand that you are exagerating for the sake of argument.

Research on Shiftworkers show the great negative impact night work has on people. Both on health, mind and family.

If you only get 15$hr, are overloaded w work and have to work 5 nights a week or more, this in 2 or 3 jobs. Why would anyone in their right mind work nights. I mean why? why when can get the same conditions (or even better) with a whole lot of other day jobs?

But again, I'm guessing that in MI the job markets sucks beyond anything I've ever seen (and hopefully never do).
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Postby ShadowChaser » Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:51 pm

K-sey Complex wrote:
ShadowChaser wrote:3.- If you compare RPSGT's to uncertified techs, the percentage of bad techs is heavily on the uncertified side... by far!. Are you really going to deny this? really? I mean really?


What qualifies you to state that as fact? Just in the last seven years I have worked with more than 60 sleep techs. Some of the best techs I have worked with weren't registered. Some of the most worthless have been.

Heavily by far?? How many techs have you worked with to come up with this conclusion?


My experience w Resgistered techs has been quite the opposite of yours. But then again in most of my 10 years in sleep I've worked in 6 of the best sleep centers in SoCal with some of the best and well known sleep doctors and researchers. In part, I've been lucky that way I must admit.

If you haven't had the chance to work top of the line Sleep and/or research centers, then I can understand why you have run into these bottom of the barrel techs.

I can only remember working with about 77 techs, and currently network with about 37 of them (almost all registered).

I seldom run into these completely "unfixable" bad techs, that suck no matter what you do, so I can't relate with you on that either, maybe I've been lucky that way too... 8)
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Postby K-sey Complex » Mon Jun 04, 2012 11:10 pm

If you think I am exaggerating, check back on this thread in two years. Maybe one...

It seems we have both worked with a great number of techs. It is now apparent to me that we may have different standards on what we consider a to be a good tech.
In any case overpaid is defined as "makes too much money". If you have never seen a tech who you feel makes too much money then good for you. I don't believe it but good for you.

Overpaid is a word that clearly is unsettling to you but never the less, when a new generation of employees can do the same quality job as you but are willing to do it for less then I'm interested in hearing what unnecessarily complex term you choose. I choose overpaid not because I like it, because it's fitting.
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Postby K-sey Complex » Mon Jun 04, 2012 11:15 pm

*That $15 figure does not include a shift differential. But the number is very realistic. I started as an unregistered tech at $14.67 in 2005. The economy was good in 2005.
Several techs i started with I still work with. ALL of us were happy to get that $14.67.
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Postby K-sey Complex » Mon Jun 04, 2012 11:17 pm

I should also add that prior to landing the job of sleep tech I was a surgical tech in the OR where I was making less than that.
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Postby ShadowChaser » Tue Jun 05, 2012 2:18 am

K-sey Complex wrote:If you think I am exaggerating, check back on this thread in two years. Maybe one...

.


K-sey we both have clearly strong opinions, and we just gotta agree to disagree on the "overpaid" thing...

If I Ever end up working in a Carwash, I promise you that I will writte a full length apology letter addressed to you (w carwash return address) . Everyone should be able to be humble enough to admit to having any honest job.

Btw, I would be surprised if our definitions of what is a good tech are any different, so no need for the jab there.

ONe last thing. LIke I mentioned before, I think we can all admit that there's lousy workers in any group of ppl (nurses, doctors, phd's etc). But that does not take away the value of their license/registration. When you run into a bunch of bad doctors or nurses (many of those too) you dont go and say that their MD or RN mean nothing. And it does not mean that you're gonna say that the medical boards or the NCLEX exams are worthless. It just means that those specific individuals sucked... that's it!

The "RPSGT" has its own intrinsic value, and the fact that some people don't live up to and/or deserve to hold it (yes I know some of those too), has everything to do with those specific ppl and nothing to do with the credential itself. Can we agree on that?

I doubt if anyone is ever going to utter the words "some of the best doctors/nurses I know are not certified/registered"...

p.s. If Ann Frank was able to still see most people in a positive light and that they can be good if given a chance, so should we (even about sleep techs). 10-4
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Postby ShadowChaser » Tue Jun 05, 2012 2:36 am

TexasSleepguy wrote:
TexasSleepguy wrote:ummm..ok

Alvarez theory K-T....the point was Old over paid Techs grab your ankles..


The coment was directed at what the hospital considered Overpaid Techs.
Hospitals and some IDTF will lowball to get out sheap as they can.
If the Hospital thinks techs are overpaid they fade them out regardless of skill.


Okay Texas. I can admit that I got a little carried away, so I withdraw my last remark as you do seem like a nice guy. :oops:
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Postby ShadowChaser » Tue Jun 05, 2012 2:38 am

Sandmanmike wrote:Love the debate here. IDTFs, much like walmart drive wages down.

. It was actually a great deal. Physicians across america (think cardiology/pulm practices) had all that empty space at night to generate more income out of existing infrastructure.

So now you have business models that thrived on the idea that for every 300$ spent on a nightly charge of staffing your return on that investment was 1800$ on the non facility charge or about $5200 within a facility, under the ideal of a 2:1 staffing ratio. Less your physician and operational expenses. Etc. Etc. Etc.

So the only way to "hedge" against the HST drop in lab census, is to either stack another patient to the mix or drop wages. Because the management expense will be the last thing to go in a private company <wink>

Feel free to troll me as necessary. Just my view on the wage war in Sleep ; )
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Postby ShadowChaser » Tue Jun 05, 2012 2:44 am

ShadowChaser wrote:
Sandmanmike wrote:Love the debate here. IDTFs, much like walmart drive wages down.

. It was actually a great deal. Physicians across america (think cardiology/pulm practices) had all that empty space at night to generate more income out of existing infrastructure.

So now you have business models that thrived on the idea that for every 300$ spent on a nightly charge of staffing your return on that investment was 1800$ on the non facility charge or about $5200 within a facility, under the ideal of a 2:1 staffing ratio. Less your physician and operational expenses. Etc. Etc. Etc.

So the only way to "hedge" against the HST drop in lab census, is to either stack another patient to the mix or drop wages. Because the management expense will be the last thing to go in a private company <wink>

Feel free to troll me as necessary. Just my view on the wage war in Sleep ; )


Your comment seems to make sense. It reminded me of the new upstart in san diego trying to open a "mobile sleep lab", doing sleep studies in any given doctors office from night to night.

Have you seen this before? What salary to you give a tech that drives a "Sleep truck" that delivers a "Sleep Lab"? :-k
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Postby K-sey Complex » Tue Jun 05, 2012 3:00 am

No problem with disagreeing. None at all.

One other thing we either do or will likely disagree about then would be your view on the value of an RPSGT credential. I think we may or may not agree that what it is now, isn't what it was. And what it is now, isn't what it's going to be. RPSGT is not nearly as in demand as it once was due to a flooded market and is falling fast. That paper used to mean you could demand a higher wage. Now? Nothing like it was. Or it won't be for long anyway. Even with no RPSGT, a RST will still be able to work at accredited labs. This lends less value to an RPSGT paper. If RST is easier to earn and equally accepted then RPSGT, no matter what it took to get it, becomes even less valuable.

In any case, it is not a license like MD/RN/etc. Therefore in my eyes it has nowhere near the value. Go get a job as a nurse or a doctor.... you can't. But I got a job as a sleep tech without an ounce of experience much less a piece of paper saying I know what I'm doing.
If the feds or the states require a license or registry for sleep techs, I would tend to agree with you more. Right now? Yeah RPSGT is still worth something. But it's monetary value is dropping right along with the rest of the wages.
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RPSGT cant work in Florida

Postby dreamweaver333 » Thu Jun 07, 2012 12:36 am

Someone posted MC regs by state for RPSGT req'd for MC, etc. Don't mean to be lazy--will look it up myself. But, not as good as most on here at sorting thru "MC-speak." NOT trying to bore you with "sad" story-but frustrated.

PLEASE tell me Florida is one of those 39 states! Somehow, don't think so. RPSGTs & RRTs are getting short-changed in Florida (my opinion). I have been RRT (granted by NBRC) since 1987. Got RPSGT last year-yay! (thanks to everyone's help on here). Was working for Drs office sleep lab-they promised for 8mths a full-time position w/benefits to first person who got RPSGT. They fired me--OJT techs MUCH CHEAPER than credentialed sleep professionals. As a dual credentialed tech, w/BS in Allied Health, having terrible time getting employment. That is with impeccable references (even letter of recommendation from past employer). Working LESS & making MUCH less than I did before registry.
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Postby goudasleep » Thu Jun 07, 2012 10:35 am

I think Florida is one of the lowest-paid states, re sleep techs. I also think, and have stated, the that RST certification is part of a strategy to drive wages down.
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payscales

Postby TexasSleepguy » Sun Jun 10, 2012 4:25 pm

I am not sure where we are heading with sleep. Seems to be a push for RRTs in the area where I am working--
I started in sleep late 1988 or early 89 I forget. My pay was soooooo low 7 bucks an hour. We were an FDA research lab. Charting was difficult and detailed. Each mornings we had to stay over and do "Grand Rounds" with the Neurologist and then sit in a class with the Physician half day on saturday. Trainng lasted about a year. I was the only male in the department and was stuck with Tuesday Night NPTs. Sleep has improves since they dropped those test and pay did get better.
What will happen if anything with the RST is anyones guess.
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Postby somnonaut » Mon Jun 11, 2012 4:19 am

IF wages are pushed down there will be no incentive for people to enter the field, ergo ANY credential will not be worth anything. People will not enter a field and have to go through the rigamaroll of education and credentialing with spiraling down wages.
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Postby ShadowChaser » Mon Jun 11, 2012 6:11 am

somnonaut wrote:IF wages are pushed down there will be no incentive for people to enter the field, ergo ANY credential will not be worth anything. People will not enter a field and have to go through the rigamaroll of education and credentialing with spiraling down wages.


I agree, but dont't forget the graveyard shift part of it. I add all that crap , plus the night shift... I mean, what incentive would most ppl have to even consider entering the field? =/
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