Adequate pay for work?

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Postby Gizmo » Sat Aug 18, 2012 12:04 am

To help get a good idea of what the various pay scales are across the country, you can go to indeed.com and type in RPSGT or sleep tech and then leave the city/state open. So many positions will come up and many of them include a pay scale. 8)
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Postby K-sey Complex » Sat Aug 18, 2012 4:40 am

Gizmo wrote:THEY CAN'T DO YOUR JOB (yet) and it will take them quite awhile before they can.


20 years experience doing D+ work isn't worth shit compared to an education, desire to learn, willingness to listen and giving 100%. So it's naive to think those students "CAN'T DO YOUR JOB". They may be better at it already.
It's tiring hearing or reading how experience or seniority is everything. Because you've been somewhere doing something for any length of time does not mean you are worth a damn at it and means nothing to me. It's what you did and continue to do that matters.

I have no opinion at all on what this poster's abilities are or their value as a tech. I couldn't possibly so I would not assume they are worth more or less than any other tech. As far as pay goes, years on the job only matters when you are starting a new one. After that it's performance that matters. Nothing else. In my world anyway.

If anyone feels they are underpaid and are confident that their work performance and experience combined warrants a raise, by all means ask for one. But I would make oh so sure my opinion is one likely to be shared by my employer. If you are just a D+ tech who thinks they are owed more money just because they are "experienced" then I would not draw one bit of attention to my salary. Hiring those students would look like a damn sound financial decision.
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Postby Gizmo » Sat Aug 18, 2012 4:53 am

K-sey, I agree with most of what you are saying. Being an A+ tech, I'll only mention why I said those students can't do your job (yet).

I have worked "hands on" with many psg students in the past few years. For the most part, I've been disappointed. I thought they would know a lot more than they do. Not one of them has been able to score accurately ... in fact, their scoring is often a disaster. They have all been very weak on their EKG arrthymias. Many couldn't keep their eyes open past 3 am. This is just MY experience and doesn't speak for every psg student out there.

17 years of doing this and I still LOVE it!
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Postby K-sey Complex » Sat Aug 18, 2012 5:55 am

Very mixed results from the PSG students indeed. I often question the qualifications of some of the program instructors. I hear things that make me shake my head a lot. Perhaps yet another example of choosing an instructor based on their number of years experience and not the level or quality of experience.
One graduate recently told me that their instructor told them that esophageal pressure monitoring is an older practice that no longer exists. WTH?? :-k
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Postby RPSGT88athome » Sat Aug 18, 2012 6:37 am

Yeah I hear stuff like that from students.

I can tell really quick the ones who will be great techs. Just ask him or her pediatric scoring rules. Or ask them to explain EXACTLY how a pulse oximeter works. The principle of operation. Or better yet, how to calculate various sleep statistics. Some students can do this. They develop into great techs.

RPSGT88
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Postby somnonaut » Sat Aug 18, 2012 7:05 am

Wow almost like....taking a practical exam. Who woulda thunk?
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Postby bduce » Sat Aug 18, 2012 7:31 am

Agree with the sentiments here. I often say to my colleagues: the day you stop trying to go forwards is the day you start going backwards.

Simple as that.
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Postby somnus diabolus » Sun Aug 19, 2012 12:17 am

There really are no qualifications to become an instructor that are unique to the sleep field. Some just have a Bachelor's. I even knew of one was not a RPSGT. Further more, I know of one who hasn't actually worked night shifts. This is one of the reasons they started the BS in Diagnostics and Sleep Science at UNC. This semester, we are taking a course on educating within the field. I'll let you guys know how useful it is, having had students at my current job, and being a student myself in an AAS program before.
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Postby somnus diabolus » Sun Aug 19, 2012 12:21 am

Many times, I have told RPSGT88 was a fantastic instructor he would be. Sure, the pass/fail rate would be half of other programs, but the ones who came out of it WOULD be better techs than 75% of the ones in the field. Problem is, it's a lot of work for less than what a manager of a lab gets paid. Unless you enjoy teaching, it just isn't worth it.
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Postby skeepy » Mon Sep 03, 2012 1:43 pm

somnonaut wrote:That is a sorry state of affairs if the employer has so much control over the employee that the employee cannot ask for a raise. It is times and situations such as these that power changes hands rapidly.


I agree 100%! I would not like to work under someone if I didn't feel comfortable asking for a raise. Doesn't always mean you will get what you ask for but there should not be any fear of losing your job just by asking for a raise because you've been doing a great job, earned a new credential, etc.

Bosses should expect their employees to ask for raises anyway. It's just something that happens in the workforce. Again doesn't mean that you will actually get the raise, but it's nice to be able to talk to your boss about it.
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Postby fanofcart » Fri Sep 07, 2012 7:11 pm

skeepy wrote:
somnonaut wrote:That is a sorry state of affairs if the employer has so much control over the employee that the employee cannot ask for a raise. It is times and situations such as these that power changes hands rapidly.


I agree 100%! I would not like to work under someone if I didn't feel comfortable asking for a raise. Doesn't always mean you will get what you ask for but there should not be any fear of losing your job just by asking for a raise because you've been doing a great job, earned a new credential, etc.

Bosses should expect their employees to ask for raises anyway. It's just something that happens in the workforce. Again doesn't mean that you will actually get the raise, but it's nice to be able to talk to your boss about it.


That will be easier to do (that is, asking for a raise) when the jobs picture improves.
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Postby Gizmo » Fri Sep 07, 2012 11:53 pm

Ask when your work is shining and the lab is short of techs :D It's worked for me!
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Postby fanofcart » Tue Sep 11, 2012 5:49 pm

Gizmo wrote:Ask when your work is shining and the lab is short of techs :D It's worked for me!


I don't know if (some) sleep labs care if your work is "shining" vs. being able to get a younger, cheaper, more inexperienced tech.!!! :oops: (NOT :D !)
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Postby Gizmo » Thu Sep 13, 2012 5:15 am

fanofcart wrote:
Gizmo wrote:Ask when your work is shining and the lab is short of techs :D It's worked for me!


I don't know if (some) sleep labs care if your work is "shining" vs. being able to get a younger, cheaper, more inexperienced tech.!!! :oops: (NOT :D !)


Fortunately, my supervisor wants techs who really know what they're doing and prefers more mature techs. Also, I don't make much more than a new tech but yes, I know what you are saying :wink:
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Postby Sleepe1 » Mon Sep 24, 2012 12:13 am

Current tech:

RPSGT
$20 an hour
3 years Exp.
3:1 ratio
scores on the fly to completion
ISR 80-90%
positive patient satisfaction

If this tech can do it anyone can so anything less is an excuse!

Dinos beware!
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