Really?

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Postby Amykr » Sun Dec 09, 2012 6:59 pm

when I originally was trained I was not taught how to measure heads. But I read and learned how to do it. It is much a matter of motivation of the employee as the employer. If you take the time to read and learn you will be successful even if you do not have the best trainer.
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Postby somnolencia » Sun Dec 09, 2012 10:25 pm

I was the same way. When I started, I didn't even know about the 10-20 system - someone showed me with their fingers that you put C3 "about right here". But the more info I got my hands on, the more I wanted to know and wanted to do things right for my patients, my profession, and for myself. They didn't have schools then, but there is enough good, solid information out there that if you really want to master concepts and become very proficient in this field, nothing can stop you but yourself. Plus, now there is just more info out there. Oh, how I wish I had been watching this forum all these years!!!
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sigh

Postby TexasSleepguy » Mon Dec 10, 2012 6:35 pm

Sleep sure has changed in the training. When I was being trained we had to do an internship in Neurology with the Physicians. no practical schools for polysomnography so it was hands on. The Physicians were brutal. They would stop you in a hallway and drill you on cps, filters, medications, cranial facial disorders and why it was important...etc
I am glad that we went through that type of training and miss the strictness of the filed.
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Postby RPSGT88athome » Mon Dec 10, 2012 9:54 pm

TexasSleepguy,

It certainly was more strict. In training [after being hired in my first sleep job] we were running and scoring paper records and doing statistics with a pencil, paper and calculator. When the interpreting physician would find something he did not like or that he felt was scored or calculated wrong, he would send the 900 page PSG back and tell us to re-score it. But he would not say what was wrong with it. We had to figure that out ourselves.

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Postby TexasSleepguy » Mon Dec 10, 2012 10:57 pm

RPSGT88athome wrote:TexasSleepguy,

It certainly was more strict. In training [after being hired in my first sleep job] we were running and scoring paper records and doing statistics with a pencil, paper and calculator. When the interpreting physician would find something he did not like or that he felt was scored or calculated wrong, he would send the 900 page PSG back and tell us to re-score it. But he would not say what was wrong with it. We had to figure that out ourselves.

RPSGT88


...it was on the border of mental/emotional abuse. This did force us to learn our job and know what we were talking about. There have been times when I have shown an applicant a few epochs of a sleep study and asked them what they were seeing. The reply was stage 2. I then asked why is it stage 2? Answer: because it looks like stage 2..wow.
Facing the current and up and coming Healthcare reform we are going to have to be at the top of our game to remain employed Re-read those books once again get familiar with sleep and the art of polysomnography, button up, button down and starch those lab coats. Comb your hair, shave and get ready for just about anything.
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Postby Jpeck » Wed Jan 02, 2013 11:28 pm

All sleep techs are crazy. The trick is to find one that is functionally crazy.

I have over ten years experience and I don't mark heads. But I claim to. I know how to. I'll do it if some one is watching me. I'll work any day of the week, I don't care. My wages are competitive, I am not greedy.

BUT NO MAPLE SYRUP IN THE LAB EVER. I can't see it, can't smell it I don't want it anywhere near me. If I come in to the lab and see maple syrup- I will quit with out notice.

Just saying.
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crazy

Postby izzy » Thu Jan 03, 2013 2:18 am

I wish that I could offer you a job. Ypur humor is the best. I get it with the syrup- but the techs that eat peanuts in the lab all night and leave all of the shells on the floor suck. too bad we have lost so many patients to HST.
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Postby K-sey Complex » Sun Jan 13, 2013 8:04 pm

Rwh520 wrote:I finished the A-Step modules and currently procrastinating sending off my CPSGT application to my companies headquarters to sign me off the x amount of hours I've worked (450ish hours)?


You need to be trained not to procrastinate? Your employer is not responsible for your piss poor attitude.
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Postby KendallStation » Mon Jan 28, 2013 9:35 am

Its amazing the variety of labs and applicants, what some people get used to. I agree, you should be professional regardless of the your situation ... be the exception.

I moved out west with an AAS and people were pretty stoked about it, mostly because they don't have many programs out in the PNW (or are just starting to).

Others sneer and pull the "we never had sleep school, I learned OTJ, etc and literally ask me what a TCM is when I ask why the lab doesn't have one. Well either way there is quite a range. I've always tried to kiss some butt @ interviews....

And mark your damn heads guys.
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