Fair Pay Rate, and help on advancement

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Fair Pay Rate, and help on advancement

Postby FetusInFetu » Sun Mar 28, 2004 9:22 am

i was just wondering if any 1 could help me out. i Just recently got a job at a sleep lab, with no prior expierence in the medical field, or sleep field. Ive been working here for about 5-6 months, and my starting/current pay is 12.00 hr. with no bennifits. I only work on the weekends, fri and sat night, from 8 pm till 8 am. with 3 patients a night. i have no problem preping PT, and i do PSG/TIT studies. we currently use the alice 4 system, and when i work im in the lab alone, so i basically do everything from cleaing the room/equipment/garbage etc. my question is, what can i do to get certifide, or what should i do to better my job qualifications? i am cpr certifide, and i am great with the PT, where they are constantly giving me great feedback to my superiors. also is this a normal pay rate for some 1 with no experience in ny? i also am currently in college, going for B.S in C.I.S. so i am very comfortable with the systems we use, ive read the manuels for all the units.
can any 1 give me sum insight?
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Postby fanofcart » Sun Mar 28, 2004 12:53 pm

First, you should learn to spell. I am not saying this to be petty, but this post does not make you look good. With its numerous spelling and grammatical errors you are not a good ambassador for our profession.

And three patients a night by yourself, that is wrong. It is unfair to each patient if you are testing more than two per night; some patients need to be one-on-one.

$12.00 per hour for a start-up OJT is in the ballpark, though if you are working alone without a mentor, are you learning anything?
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Need more specifics

Postby respbarb » Sun Mar 28, 2004 5:51 pm

I do agree that 3 patients a night is too much, however I understand that it is the case in many labs, some have even stated it is the norm in Canada.
You do need a mentor, and you need to get materials with which to study from so that you may pass the exam and be able to raise your salary and receive benefits.
How much training did you receive before you were working alone?
That being said, are you doing any scoring? Do you get feedback from your superiors and/or the physicians as to how well you are doing titrations?
Is there a constant learning atmosphere in your lab? Is anyone registered in your lab? How much support do you get from your superiors? Do they express an interest in your getting registered? What about other techs at your facility helping you? Does the facility have any of the recommended reading and reference material for polysomnography?
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Postby Dave » Sun Mar 28, 2004 8:55 pm

fanofcart wrote:First, you should learn to spell. I am not saying this to be petty, but this post does not make you look good. With its numerous spelling and grammatical errors you are not a good ambassador for our profession.


First, you should learn to chill out. His/her post was coherent. If anyone not being an ambassador to sleep, it's you.
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Re: Fair Pay Rate, and help on advancement

Postby Ripvanwinkle » Sun Mar 28, 2004 9:07 pm

FetusInFetu wrote:i was just wondering if any 1 could help me out. i Just recently got a job at a sleep lab, with no prior expierence in the medical field, or sleep field. Ive been working here for about 5-6 months, and my starting/current pay is 12.00 hr. with no bennifits. I only work on the weekends, fri and sat night, from 8 pm till 8 am. with 3 patients a night. i have no problem preping PT, and i do PSG/TIT studies. we currently use the alice 4 system, and when i work im in the lab alone, so i basically do everything from cleaing the room/equipment/garbage etc. my question is, what can i do to get certifide, or what should i do to better my job qualifications? i am cpr certifide, and i am great with the PT, where they are constantly giving me great feedback to my superiors. also is this a normal pay rate for some 1 with no experience in ny? i also am currently in college, going for B.S in C.I.S. so i am very comfortable with the systems we use, ive read the manuels for all the units.
can any 1 give me sum insight?


IMHO,
1) you're being taken advantage of, 3 pts/noc you are generating minimum of $2,000.00 for your employer,
2) you have no business doing this w/o healthcare training & experience; how are you supposed to identify critical cardiac arrythmias or any other sentinel events?
3) you better have malpractice insurance...BUT I bet you don't because you have not got any qualifications that would possibly make an insurer want to cover you.
4) This is one reason the AARC wants Polysomnography included in the scope of practice of RT.
5) GOOD LUCK!

(from an RRT with 20 ys experience)
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Postby fanofcart » Sun Mar 28, 2004 10:51 pm

Dave wrote:
fanofcart wrote:First, you should learn to spell. I am not saying this to be petty, but this post does not make you look good. With its numerous spelling and grammatical errors you are not a good ambassador for our profession.


First, you should learn to chill out. His/her post was coherent. If anyone not being an ambassador to sleep, it's you.


You don't think that being able to communicate well (written and orally) with doctors, patients and co-workers is important in our profession? I feel that it is.
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Postby Ripvanwinkle » Mon Mar 29, 2004 1:02 am

fanofcart wrote:
Dave wrote:
fanofcart wrote:First, you should learn to spell. I am not saying this to be petty, but this post does not make you look good. With its numerous spelling and grammatical errors you are not a good ambassador for our profession.


First, you should learn to chill out. His/her post was coherent. If anyone not being an ambassador to sleep, it's you.


You don't think that being able to communicate well (written and orally) with doctors, patients and co-workers is important in our profession? I feel that it is.


I think you replied to the wrong person, I didn't say aaything aabout communicating.
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Postby fanofcart » Mon Mar 29, 2004 1:27 am

I was responding to the post from "Dave" not from you "Ripvanwinkle." :o
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Well fanofarts

Postby Ripvanwinkle » Mon Mar 29, 2004 1:40 am

fanofcart wrote:I was responding to the post from "Dave" not from you "Ripvanwinkle." :o


WHY did it come up to be inluded as a quote when I RESPONDED?
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You can stuff it FanofFarts

Postby Ripvanwinkle » Mon Mar 29, 2004 1:44 am

fanofcart wrote:I was responding to the post from "Dave" not from you "Ripvanwinkle." :o


***, OK?

EDIT BY SLEEPADMIN - No personal attacks please. If you feel you have been treated unfairly, please contact me.
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Some useful answers....

Postby somnonaut » Mon Mar 29, 2004 4:25 am

Rip...20 Yrs experience, how many in sleep?
I have 20+ years experience in sleep medicine and started in this field thru OJT similar to FetusInFetu, luckily not 3 pts/tech. How is he/she to know...But I digress.

Being from a respiratory background can only help marginally, and some feel it actually could be harmful. Respiratory training does not offer direct sleep medicine knowledge unless one seeks that avenue of educaton for themself through a possible elective within their respiratory training, and that offering hasn't even fully started yet. Or the Respiratory trained person could obtain requisite sleep training through other methods, maybe even, Ahh! :shock: OJT, heaven forbid.

FetusInFetu...
The first thing that should be done, is to commend you for speaking up. You should do exactly what you are doing, and that is network. Find out what is done in the rest of nod-ville, especially in your area.
I am the Secretary for the New York State Society of Sleep Medicine http://www.nysssm.org
For direct Academy of Sleep Medicine direction:
AASM - Role and Qualifications of Technologists Performing Polysomnography http://www.aasmnet.org/PDF/roleandqualifications.pdf
AASM Technologist Staffing http://www.aasmnet.org/PDF/techstaffing.pdf
AASM Job descriptons http://www.aasmnet.org/psg.asp) and
the Association of Polysomnographic Technologists (APT http://www.aptweb.org/pdf/JobDescriptions.pdf.)

The scope of practice for a Polysomnographic Trainee/Technologist is limited to those described above and any restriction that would be imposed by the training facility's stated competencies and typically the starting point for the facility specific core competencies would be the APT's core competencies: http://www.aptweb.org/
PAP titration - http://www.aptweb.org/pdf/APTPAPCompetency.pdf
Supplemental Low Flow Oxygen Administration - http://www.aptweb.org/pdf/APTLowFlow02Competency.pdf
Even the American Association of Respiratory Care recognizes the RPSGT credential and its training avenues, (AARC http://www.rcjournal.com/online_resources/cpgs/polycpg.html)

I am located on Long Island and wonder where you are? How far is the closest lab to yours? It seems like a fairly small operation, 3 beds, are you rural in nature? Are you in an office, or a hospital? Please use the NYSSSM info link or PM me to reply to me confidentially on these issues if you feel it is too hostile/uncomfortable here.

Claude Albertario, RPSGT :)
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Re: You can stuff it FanofFarts

Postby fanofcart » Mon Mar 29, 2004 6:38 am

Ripvanwinkle wrote:
fanofcart wrote:I was responding to the post from "Dave" not from you "Ripvanwinkle." :o


***, OK?


???

I don't understand your animosity, Ripvanwinkle.

I was responding to something written by another poster and not you, as I previously stated. Perhaps the moderator can help clear up your questions about this, please?

:?
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Postby FetusInFetu » Mon Mar 29, 2004 9:07 am

First of all, maybe i should apologize, i may be way out of my league as i previously stated i have no medical background/training, nor am i a grammar perfectionist, and i apologize if my thoughts are incoherent, juxtaposed to not spell checking my post, due to time. i also am not here to complain about the lab i am employed by, or cry that i am being mistreated. i am merely trying to get some information to better myself. I am aware that this is a professional career for most of members of this forum, and I maybe due to being under 25, never thought of this as something i would retire from, i just looked at this as another job, where i come in and work, and that's that. but as i continue my employment, i realize that this is a great opportunity for me, and I 'm just trying to get the most out of it. with that said, let me answer some of the replies I've received from this post: ( in no particular order)

I do receive feedback from my superiors and/or the physicians as to how well I am doing titration's. I am told that titration is like an art form, it takes a lot of practice. With the help of charts and excerpt I try to recognize when cpap/bipap is to be raised.

I must admit, that I do feel very unsecure and uneasy. I never really feel like I am doing the proper thing. I do know that I make my patients feel very comfortable and make the stay as enjoyable as possible but working alone, I learn as much as I possibly can from my own errors and readings.

There is a learning atmosphere in my lab, although its not as good as if I went to school or trained for a prolonged period, I guess that is why I am on this forum, to educate myself and be better prepared.

my superiors don't really express interest in me getting registered, but they do try and teach me how to do things, but its not as hands on as id like it to be. being that i work on the weekends at night, i basically don't see anyone else that i work with. i come in to an empty lab, and leave the same way i came in. elaborating on that: my office calls me to inform me, how many patients, and what time. i come into work, look over the folders to see if the patients are coming in for psg or tit. i set them up, take notes, fill out paper work and in the morning i wake them up, clean them up and send them on there way. i than clean up the rooms, equipment, take out the garbage and leave. So I basically am not in physical contact with any one I work with. we communicate through note's, and phone calls. Occasionally I come in-in the morning and ask some questions, but due to my schedule, that isn't very often.

i suppose i try to identify critical cardiac arrhythmia's or any other sentinel events, by reading and looking at other studies that have been performed, and or scored. i do not score any of the studies, everything is recorded onto a CPU, than some one looks over the recording and scores it. my whole thing is to set them up, and make sure nothing comes unhooked, and that the patients are OK, and basically clean up.

And about malpractice ins: you are totally correct, I do not have malpractice ins, nor do I have the qualifications for an insurer to cover me.

I do admit I am a very fast learner, but i was undertrained- 4 days training, and than I began working alone. i prep patients, hook up electrode's, and watch them sleep. the hardest part I find is filling out the paper work.

Now my question is, i know i am OJT, but what does it mean to be registered? what is the procedure? what is the next step after OJT?[/i]
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Postby leo boyle » Mon Mar 29, 2004 11:03 am

First of all Fetus(what does your name mean btw?)Do you still consider yourself to be in embryonic form?..this latest letter is much more impressive than your initial posting which was loaded with mispellings.If it was me I would appreciate someone taking the time to point this out to me as this is very important when you apply for work etc.

As for starting off;well you need to have a set of goals.Does your company have a P&P regarding cpap and bipap?
If not there are some titration methods already posted here on this site.I believe I posted one on cpap myself.As for Bipap,you really need to know the fundamentals of ventilation here.It can and is done with numbers but if you know why you have to ventilate someone then you are off to a flier.
All procedures begin with greeting your pt at the door.You need to get down a 'spiel' or rehearsed dialogue to explain that night's procedure.
Once you have your pt's confidence then the battle is half over
You should explain the objectives and goals and what is to be expected from both of you.You can tell your pt that the cpap machine will deliver filtered, heated,humidified air under pressure.It will be your expertise to determine how much pressure to splint open the airway so that it does not collapse during sleep and they will be free to regain that lost sleep architecture etc.
The objectives would be to eliminate events and snoring.
Since the last part of the night is all rem and stage 2 then the goal would be to achieve this in supine rem.
Someone mentioned getting a mentor.That is a good idea also.In addition there are tons of handouts you can photocopy for your own particular subject that you coud put into a binder and keep with you at all times.That binder is now 3 duffel bags deep for myself!
Looks like you can speak up for yourself.That is a good thing.Keep in touch with boards like this one.If you go through some of the posts here you may find some of your questions addressed already.

Leo
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Postby sleep for thought » Mon Mar 29, 2004 11:54 am

WOW- :roll:

Mr. Fetus you are being TAKEN ADVANTAGE OF!! Three patient for twelve dollars an hour- are you kidding me. I realize you are just trying to do the best for yourself and making the most of your opportunity


People of the sleep community- Note exhibit A - this is what happens when are field is left unregulated!!!!!!

Is this not a classic example off a profit minded doctor taking advantage of cheap labor.

And what about the patients - Don't they ask you about your training?

It took me approx two months to feel barely comfortable and confident about properly hooking up patients and preforming titrations and that was with an experienced tech working very closely with me!!!


No offense personally to you Mr. Fetus but your employer is at fault here!!!!

SHAME ON HIM :evil: :evil: :twisted: :twisted:

AND CLAUDE YOUR ANTI- RESPIRATORY RANTS ARE GETTING OLD!!!!
WE ALREADY KNOW YOU HATE RRT'S GIVE IT A REST!!!!!
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