RPSGT in NC

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RPSGT in NC

Postby jld0104 » Wed Jun 08, 2011 11:42 pm

I am new to this site and actually just stumbled upon it while doing some research. It has been very informative and helpful!! :D I need some advice. I am set to begin my Associates degree in RPSGT in the fall. I am very excited at this new and exciting profession. My delima.... it appears that there are not very many jobs openings in NC... i do not wish to go to school for something that i will not be able to find a job doing once i graduate. :roll: I am not in a postion where i am unemployed and am simple going to school because i think this will be a exciting and rewarding career... I am not sure if i am just not looking in the correct area or do you find that it is hard to find a job??? ANY help or advice is VERY appreciate!!
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Postby K-sey Complex » Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:06 am

Welcome to the forums.
I'll just throw my $0.02 at you. If I were you...

If airways interest you and you are set to start an associates program I would complete a respiratory therapy AAS program and get the added sleep credential to go with it. You can be RPSGT without a degree but you can't be an RT without the associates. You could spend two years on one job opportunity or two years on two. The RT degree gives you the option to do both jobs. The Polysom degree get's you a sleep job and that's about it.
If you are seeing poor job opportunity already, might want to consider being a dual threat and not limit yourself to one.

I respect anyone with a degree in anything but in a field where 95+% of the techs working do not have a polysom degree, and no requirement for one in the remotely near future, I would seriously consider another type of degree program. I am by no means saying being a sleep tech is a bad living or a less desirable job. It's just about job security and by what you describe of your job market you could use more of it. Same is true around my neck of the woods. Too many techs looking.
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Postby RPSGT88athome » Thu Jun 09, 2011 2:14 am

Just an FYI...

Out of my last 4 full time sleep tech new hires 3 were from an AAS Polysomnography program in NC. Not an add-on to an RT credential. They all were absolutely superior in every way.

The one person I did not hire from an AAS Polysomngoraphy program was an RRT/RPSGT who lasted 3 weeks. Although the licensed RRT/RPSGT had been running studies for 18 months at a different lab and had plenty of book smarts the person was not prepared for the job.

My point is, don't rely on RRT education so much if you want to be in sleep. If you want to be a sleep techd do the AAS Polysomnography program and be a great student. You should have no problem finding a job.

Which school are you considering?

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Re: RPSGT in NC

Postby A New Convert » Thu Jun 09, 2011 2:16 am

jld0104 wrote:I am new to this site and actually just stumbled upon it while doing some research. It has been very informative and helpful!! :D I need some advice. I am set to begin my Associates degree in RPSGT in the fall. I am very excited at this new and exciting profession. My delima.... it appears that there are not very many jobs openings in NC... i do not wish to go to school for something that i will not be able to find a job doing once i graduate. :roll: I am not in a postion where i am unemployed and am simple going to school because i think this will be a exciting and rewarding career... I am not sure if i am just not looking in the correct area or do you find that it is hard to find a job??? ANY help or advice is VERY appreciate!!


If you limit yyourself to one area, say greenville, then yes, your options may be limited. However if come out of school and immediately sit for your boards, pass them, and youre willing to relocate then you should have no issue finding a sleep job.
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Postby tiredjohnny1 » Thu Jun 09, 2011 2:29 am

K-Sey makes a good point about learning two careers with one education. I personally don't like respiratory care but love EEG. If you are near Hickory or Grantsboro you might consider taking the neurodiagnostic technology program. That would qualify you for all modalities of neurodiagnostics including EEG, EP, IOM, NCS, and PSG. Not only would you be trained you would also be eligible to sit for any of those boards upon graduation. I assure you that you will never be unemployed with any of the neuro credentials. It comes down to your proximity to educational programs and your personal preference of careers.
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Postby tiredjohnny1 » Thu Jun 09, 2011 2:47 am

By the way the work at UNC of creating a Bachelor of Neurodiagnostic and Sleep Science Degree is progressing steadily and within two years should be admitting students. It will be an online program for those who have a degree from a CAAHEP accredited neurodiagnostics program. I am not sure if a sleep only program would qualify but perhaps. A respiratory program would not qualify however. You can receive credit for your Associate Degree and your credentials (RPSGT and R EEG T). In the end only about 30 credits (one year) will be required. The opportunity to have a bachelors degree from UNC with only an additional year of school is a very nice benefit. Of course you cannot count on this because it has not received complete approval but it should be a thought in your consideration.
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Postby tiredjohnny1 » Thu Jun 09, 2011 3:00 am

Almost forgot...Pamlico is all online now too so you don't even need to be close. Tuition is cheap in NC but not so much for anyone out of state. So if you have the notion to do neurodiagnostics as opposed to respiratory in theory you could go online to Pamlico, earn an associates in neurodiagnostics, sit for all your neuro boards including sleep, then continue online at UNC for an additional year earning your bachelors all at a relatively inexpensive price. There are probably similar programs for respiratory as well but I am not aware of any that let you skip a year.
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Postby K-sey Complex » Thu Jun 09, 2011 5:10 am

Two things... all of your eggs in one basket is never a good idea when it's completely avoidable.
Secondly... Yes there are techs with dual credentials who are not good at their job but that has zero to do with you.

I see PLENTY techs being churned out of Polysom AAS programs who don't know half of what some who come from 80 hour A-Step classes do. It's not the program that makes a good tech, it's the student.

The neuro-diagnostic route is an even better angle than the reps. one. If one of those programs are near you, strongly consider it. Like I said youcan get a sleep job with the RT or Neuro credentials but can only get a sleep tech job with PSG degree.

Personally I'd never get training for one career when it could be for two in the same amount of time. That and unless you plan on joining the other 80+% of this field who never get off the night shift, you'd better have a plan B.
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RPSGT in NC

Postby jld0104 » Thu Jun 09, 2011 6:55 pm

Thank you so very much for all of the helpful information.... I have considered RT in the past but do not feel it is the proper carreer for me. I am now interested in the END AAS degree. And as stated would make far more sense so i will essentially then have a few more open job paths. Now my ? is what is the difference in AAS in END and AAS in RPSGT in terms of work enviroment and salary differences??
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Postby sleepguy » Thu Jun 09, 2011 7:11 pm

"? is what is the difference in AAS in END and AAS in RPSGT in terms of work enviroment and salary differences??"

Waaaaay too much sputum in RT. Waaaaay too many nuts in Neuro. Nice sleepy folks in Sleep.

You do the math.
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Re: RPSGT in NC

Postby A New Convert » Thu Jun 09, 2011 8:53 pm

jld0104 wrote:Thank you so very much for all of the helpful information.... I have considered RT in the past but do not feel it is the proper carreer for me. I am now interested in the END AAS degree. And as stated would make far more sense so i will essentially then have a few more open job paths. Now my ? is what is the difference in AAS in END and AAS in RPSGT in terms of work enviroment and salary differences??



Base salaries are similar. The difference is that with sleep you almost always have a night differential. If you don't have a differential it will likely just be built in to you base hourly wage, which is, imo, superior to the differential because you PTO has that bonus figured in as well.
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Postby RPSGT88athome » Thu Jun 09, 2011 9:12 pm

EEG gets paid less across the board. They also work 5 days a week while sleep usually works 3 nights. Usually no overtime for EEG. Lots of overtime for sleep. Usually spitting, screaming, fighting kids ripping off wires all damn day long in EEG. Rarely do you see kids in sleep.

Stress level for EEG: high
Stress level for Sleep: low

I've done both. I don't like to go to work everyday and know I will be screamed at in my face most or all day long and have my delicate work physically destroyed for less money. Might as well work in a prison system. Its also nice to have confused patients sent down for an EEG in restraints with a freshly amputated leg, diaper overflowing with crap and coating the bloody stump...stench taking over your lab area and nursing saying they will have someone clean the pt when she "gets back" up to the floor...yeah right. and the docs expect a clean recording.

Sleep. More money, less working days/week, much lower stress.

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Postby tiredjohnny1 » Fri Jun 10, 2011 1:37 am

RPSGT88athome wrote:EEG gets paid less across the board. They also work 5 days a week while sleep usually works 3 nights. Usually no overtime for EEG. Lots of overtime for sleep. Usually spitting, screaming, fighting kids ripping off wires all damn day long in EEG. Rarely do you see kids in sleep.

Stress level for EEG: high
Stress level for Sleep: low

I've done both. I don't like to go to work everyday and know I will be screamed at in my face most or all day long and have my delicate work physically destroyed for less money. Might as well work in a prison system. Its also nice to have confused patients sent down for an EEG in restraints with a freshly amputated leg, diaper overflowing with crap and coating the bloody stump...stench taking over your lab area and nursing saying they will have someone clean the pt when she "gets back" up to the floor...yeah right. and the docs expect a clean recording.

Sleep. More money, less working days/week, much lower stress.

RPSGT88


I can see where you're coming from with this but its a somewhat limited perspective. If you're making a direct comparison of hospital eeg position vs. sleep lab then I would agree. However, there are many opportunities in adult neurology physician offices either as an employee or a contractor. The scenarios you described simply would not happen in that setting. Also, daytime vs. nighttime work is a preference. Daytime work would offer variety consisting of EEG, EP, and/or NCS. In many offices (like where I work) overnight EEG and sleep studies are performed which would give the option for night work doing 3-12 hour nights. It also would allow for getting off the night shift at some point which is often a frustration after some number of years in sleep. Many neurodiagnostic techs also have tremendous opportunities to do contract work or other self-employment ventures that are not available in sleep. It is true that daytime hospital EEG tech vs. nighttime sleep tech is going to pay less. However, that is really only one position. A competent CAAHEP-accredited neurodiagnostic program graduate in my opinion can demand much more money in a physician office setting than a sleep tech can in most settings. They also have opportunities for self-employment or management.

ASET's latest salary survey listed holders of RPSGT having an average salary of 66k and REEGT of 60k. After finishing a neurodiagnostic program however a tech can hold multiple credentials. According to the survey that increases the average wage to 84k. The information for self-employed techs was startling to me. The average is 112k but the range goes up to 416k.

So all the scenarios along with personal preferences and goals have to be considered. My point in all this is just to say that if the OP doesnt like respiratory and definitely wants to do sleep, doing an ND program will accomplish the goal of learning sleep but also provide more options.
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Postby A New Convert » Fri Jun 10, 2011 1:57 am

tiredjohnny1 wrote:
RPSGT88athome wrote:EEG gets paid less across the board. They also work 5 days a week while sleep usually works 3 nights. Usually no overtime for EEG. Lots of overtime for sleep. Usually spitting, screaming, fighting kids ripping off wires all damn day long in EEG. Rarely do you see kids in sleep.

Stress level for EEG: high
Stress level for Sleep: low

I've done both. I don't like to go to work everyday and know I will be screamed at in my face most or all day long and have my delicate work physically destroyed for less money. Might as well work in a prison system. Its also nice to have confused patients sent down for an EEG in restraints with a freshly amputated leg, diaper overflowing with crap and coating the bloody stump...stench taking over your lab area and nursing saying they will have someone clean the pt when she "gets back" up to the floor...yeah right. and the docs expect a clean recording.

Sleep. More money, less working days/week, much lower stress.

RPSGT88


I can see where you're coming from with this but its a somewhat limited perspective. If you're making a direct comparison of hospital eeg position vs. sleep lab then I would agree. However, there are many opportunities in adult neurology physician offices either as an employee or a contractor. The scenarios you described simply would not happen in that setting. Also, daytime vs. nighttime work is a preference. Daytime work would offer variety consisting of EEG, EP, and/or NCS. In many offices (like where I work) overnight EEG and sleep studies are performed which would give the option for night work doing 3-12 hour nights. It also would allow for getting off the night shift at some point which is often a frustration after some number of years in sleep. Many neurodiagnostic techs also have tremendous opportunities to do contract work or other self-employment ventures that are not available in sleep. It is true that daytime hospital EEG tech vs. nighttime sleep tech is going to pay less. However, that is really only one position. A competent CAAHEP-accredited neurodiagnostic program graduate in my opinion can demand much more money in a physician office setting than a sleep tech can in most settings. They also have opportunities for self-employment or management.

ASET's latest salary survey listed holders of RPSGT having an average salary of 66k and REEGT of 60k. After finishing a neurodiagnostic program however a tech can hold multiple credentials. According to the survey that increases the average wage to 84k. The information for self-employed techs was startling to me. The average is 112k but the range goes up to 416k.

So all the scenarios along with personal preferences and goals have to be considered. My point in all this is just to say that if the OP doesnt like respiratory and definitely wants to do sleep, doing an ND program will accomplish the goal of learning sleep but also provide more options.



..... You are going to have to work hard to find an MD making $400k+ in END...



You are going to have to provide some kind of back up to those numbers. An independant contracting EEG tech, with his/her own equipment, working constantly, might be able to bring in the $112k you reference. 99% of EEG techs are going to make $15-25 an hour based on experience. That is not anywhere NEAR an average of $84k a year.


Your survey must be looking at sleep techs in an urban setting in either LA or New York, because the AVERAGE wage for an RPSGT is not $66k a year. That is $33 an hour, assuming they work 40hrs a week, which a lot of techs dont.


I need to see this survey you are quoting, because the salaries you are claiming as 'average' are far from it. $66k is the higher end of the spectrum for a working RPSGT. There are many many more making half that.
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Postby tiredjohnny1 » Fri Jun 10, 2011 2:15 am

I wasnt trying to say the average tech is going to make 400k. What I was saying is that ND techs have a greater opportunity for self-employment as indicated by the survey. The average income in the survey is 112k and that is very possible.

As for the numbers, I used the nationalized salary information from ASET's most recent salary survey dated May 11, 2011. I don't have permission to post a copy of it but all those who participated in the salary survey received a free copy. It's available from ASET.

As for an MD not making 400k well thats his own fault. I work for a two physician neurology practice doing sleep, EEG, LTM, and NCS/EMG and after expenses our doctors clear about 750k each.
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