RPSGT in NC

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Postby Rocklandish » Fri Jun 10, 2011 7:41 am

My wife just got offered 65k a year as an END tech from a contract company.
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Postby RPSGT88athome » Fri Jun 10, 2011 8:03 am

"contract"

So she's not making $112 - 400K? I'm shocked.

However, she is certainly to be appreciated!

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Postby Rocklandish » Fri Jun 10, 2011 9:02 am

RPSGT88athome wrote:"contract"

So she's not making $112 - 400K? I'm shocked.

However, she is certainly to be appreciated!

RPSGT88


Lol, I was pretty proud of her when she turned it down to continue her IOM training.
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Postby tiredjohnny1 » Fri Jun 10, 2011 11:18 am

Rocklandish wrote:
RPSGT88athome wrote:"contract"

So she's not making $112 - 400K? I'm shocked.

However, she is certainly to be appreciated!

RPSGT88


Lol, I was pretty proud of her when she turned it down to continue her IOM training.


Well Rock they can disbelieve all they want but she is doing a good thing. IOM is where the most money is. Average pay for employed CNIM is 74k. Self-employed hourly fee range is $75-240. If you provide equipment its up to $700 hourly. Per case fee is $500-1500. If you provide equipment its up to 2k per case. She might have those opportunities because of her education in a neurodiagnostics program. She also has the option to be a sleep tech if she chooses. But she would likely never have the potential for such earnings if she had gone to a sleep-only program.
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Postby RPSGT88athome » Fri Jun 10, 2011 12:07 pm

Yeah Yeah. By the time you've made equipment payments, individual medical malpractice payments, Independant Contractor Federal witholding payments etc etc...tell me how many self-employed individuals in the entire United States are providing this specific service? I believe we're talking about a handful of people...or less.

What you're talking about is actually irrelevant to the OP's question.

I've done IOM. At a major university teaching hospital here in NC, IOM techs were being paid $19/hr. And its really cold in the OR. Standing around freezing all day long. I would pay money not to have to do that. Might as well be working for the DOT.

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Postby tiredjohnny1 » Fri Jun 10, 2011 2:04 pm

RPSGT88athome wrote:Yeah Yeah. By the time you've made equipment payments, individual medical malpractice payments, Independant Contractor Federal witholding payments etc etc...tell me how many self-employed individuals in the entire United States are providing this specific service? I believe we're talking about a handful of people...or less.

What you're talking about is actually irrelevant to the OP's question.

I've done IOM. At a major university teaching hospital here in NC, IOM techs were being paid $19/hr. And its really cold in the OR. Standing around freezing all day long. I would pay money not to have to do that. Might as well be working for the DOT.

RPSGT88


I do contract EEG work for physicians and at some facilities along with my sleep/eeg employment and do quite well for myself. I couldnt do that only with sleep training. Neuro techs are in demand and its very common that they have opportunities on the side, if they want. Not so much with sleep. The conversation turned into a discussion about salaries, etc. but my point is absolutely relevent to the OP's question. Its simple math. 5 career opportunities are better than one, especially for training that is the same cost and time. Many neurodiagnostic programs qualify you for EEG, EP, NCS, IOM, and PSG. How is that not better than learning only sleep? Especially when the OP's primary concern was job opportunities?
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Postby K-sey Complex » Fri Jun 10, 2011 4:20 pm

Since the talk is of job opportunity and somewhat about salary ask everyone posting two questions, unbiasedly.

1. Do you honestly think sleep tech wages will go up or down?

Remembering that the AASM credential will likely be easier to get and has a strong potential to replace RPSGT. Also that programs are churning out sleep techs quicker than the job has demands for. "Over-qualified" is a term we will likely be hearing more of.

2. Do you honestly think that the job security of a sleep tech is getting more secure or less?

Remembering that there are plenty of younger techs coming out of programs ready to work for $15 an hour. That and technology and accreditation standards are allowing for more out of lab studies being done and that number is set to grow for sure. Also remember that soon there will be efficient and AASM approved automated scoring software available. Eliminating the demand for scoring techs significantly. The potential for remote monitoring becoming more common exists. That and it's likely that 3:1 tech ratios will be more and more common.
I'm not talking this year or all of this... maybe not next year or even the year after that. But it is coming.

You work hard and earn a degree you expect a career out of it. A long one. A degree in this field ALONE could prove to be a bad move in 4-5 years. Maybe less. Yeah it's a great job but the job is changing and not for the better. It is a safe, steady career field. Right now it is.
Not trying to be a "Donnie Downer" here but I'm just stating my predictions and I'm not happy to say them. Things to consider when choosing what to go to school for or choosing a career path.
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Postby K-sey Complex » Fri Jun 10, 2011 4:26 pm

You know what? It turns out my question is fairly biased. Skip that whole unbiased thing.
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Postby jld0104 » Fri Jun 10, 2011 8:02 pm

First, thank you to all who have posted on this topic and you have all made very valueable to intersting points. Can anyone who has a AAS in END tell me what you do furing your 40 work week?? Also can any RPSGT's tell me if i were to go for END and set for my RPSGT after graduation will i not be considered as much for a RPSGT job as say someone who went for AAS in RPSGT??? I am not a risky person and what to make the best and most well informed choice.
Thank you all again :D
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Postby RPSGT88athome » Sun Jun 12, 2011 6:43 pm

jld0104,

It depends a lot on you. How much you study. How easily do you learn? Will you give it 140%?

I went through an END program. I have hired AAS END grads as well as AAS Poly grads. I even hired someone who was an END program director at several colleges and was registered in EEG. I have my own unique viewpoint on this.

An AAS END program is good to get you started because the entrance exam requirements for registration in each modality are reduced. That said, and you should be very aware of this point, you will not be proficient in 5 modalities upon graduation. You will likely not even be proficient in one. That's the rub.

My position is it takes two years of full time work while studying on the side to develop a proficient EEG -or- Sleep Technologist. If you want to be good at what you do, choose a modality and stick with it.

Other than for regulatory reasons, I don't care what letters you have behind your name. You can be an RRT, R.EEGT, RPSGT, CNIM or whatever. If I hire you and determine you are minimally proficient for the task then you will be let go. Within 3 weeks.

More credentials do not even usually mean more pay. How many techs out there actually perform 2,3, 4 or 5 modalities on a regular basis? Practically none. I am always very suspect when people show off their registrations. Yes they have lots of them but has the person actually mastered each modality? As we well know registration in a modality does not mean a person has mastered it. My practice has let go more RPSGTs than any other I know...for not measuring up to our standards.

My advice: Regardless of AAS program, choose one modality and master it. You will then be guaranteed work.

And the END program director? Determined not to be proficient.

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Postby RPSGT88athome » Sun Jun 12, 2011 8:01 pm

In addition to the multi-credentials for more pay topic, a better statement would be: How many employers need or require each employee to perform 2,3,4 or 5 modalities? Of the two university teaching hospitals I worked at, one required some of the END techs to alternate between sleep and EEG. The other hospital had dedicated sleep vs. daytime techs of which some were just doing EEGs. Very few did EEGs and EPs. Nerve conduction techs never did anything else.

My point is, I think it is not very often an employer needs a tech to be proficient in multiple END modalities. Certain hospital END depts do have such needss. But not most other employers.

It is my experience that most techs are hired to do one type of job. Sleep. EEG. Nerve Conductions. Most are not hired to do multiple jobs. If a tech is hired to do one job then possession of multiple credentials is not going to bring in more pay. It may actually do the opposite and make the tech appear "overqualified" or even "unspecialized" in any single modality. Why should I hire someone for a sleep tech job who has been off doing some other modality for the past 2 years? These are things I think about when hiring people.

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Postby tiredjohnny1 » Mon Jun 13, 2011 2:29 am

RPSGT88athome wrote: An AAS END program is good to get you started because the entrance exam requirements for registration in each modality are reduced. That said, and you should be very aware of this point, you will not be proficient in 5 modalities upon graduation. You will likely not even be proficient in one. That's the rub.

My position is it takes two years of full time work while studying on the side to develop a proficient EEG -or- Sleep Technologist. If you want to be good at what you do, choose a modality and stick with it.


While I have complete respect for you, I don't think it's fair to give this advice as a general rule. What is going to make a person happy in their career is important to consider. You went to an END program. You explored your options. You settled on sleep and are an undisputed master of it. You ended up sticking with it but you also explored other options, which is what I encouraged the OP to set himself up for. He might love sleep but after 4 years hate working nights. Since day positions don't come along that often, now the job he has mastered has become a source of frustration and unhappiness. On the other hand, if he had over the years worked in EEG, EP, and sleep, now he has options.

RPSGT88athome wrote: Other than for regulatory reasons, I don't care what letters you have behind your name. You can be an RRT, R.EEGT, RPSGT, CNIM or whatever. If I hire you and determine you are minimally proficient for the task then you will be let go. Within 3 weeks.

Most employers understand a fresh college graduate is only going to have entry level competency. If that is not your standard, I can appreciate that, especially in a lab that only performs sleep. But I am willing to hire a high-performing graduate that I can use in sleep, EEG, NCS, or EP. That gives me lots of options. Sure they might not be a master currently, but in time they likely will be, given past performance.

RPSGT88athome wrote: More credentials do not even usually mean more pay. How many techs out there actually perform 2,3, 4 or 5 modalities on a regular basis? Practically none. I am always very suspect when people show off their registrations. Yes they have lots of them but has the person actually mastered each modality? As we well know registration in a modality does not mean a person has mastered it. My practice has let go more RPSGTs than any other I know...for not measuring up to our standards.

In NC the hospitals are outstanding and very specialized. However, in Florida and I suspect elsewhere, there are daily ads for dual or multiple credentialed techs to perform all modalities within the neuro department. I have seen those advertisements every week for the past 5 years. We have two major hospital systems in Florida and it is the same for both. They also pay an additional $4.00 per hour for each credential up to two credentials. And private neurology practices will often want techs with dual credentials and pay for it. I agree that you probably have let go many RPSGTs. Our credential as it is currently does not verify skills. However, the EEG, EP, and NCS boards are much more difficult and also require oral/clinical exams as verification. Typically those techs know what they are doing. If they are let go, it is often because of a lack of personal motivation or problem, not due to a lack of mastery of technique and concepts.


RPSGT88athome wrote: My advice: Regardless of AAS program, choose one modality and master it. You will then be guaranteed work.

Is anyone guaranteed work nowadays? Even very proficient sleep techs? Of course not. But the more options you give yourself the more chances you have for employment. While I have a great amount of respect for you, I disagree with you on this specific topic.
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Postby RPSGT88athome » Mon Jun 13, 2011 4:31 am

Yes we're going to have to disagree.

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Postby Rocklandish » Mon Jun 13, 2011 4:54 am

My wife graduated from the Clarian END program in Indy run by Debra Ferguson REEGT, RPSGT, too many to name. We recently found out that this was one of the top 5 schools in the country for producing END techs. My wife graduated completely trained in everything except sleep.

I am not saying that my wife knows everything she needs to know James. I will tell you that it only took her 1 week to get the complete trust of her physicians and that she has been on her own for 5 out of the six weeks she has been working.

Did you fall out of bed last night or what? :P

I know of at least 3 different labs in Co. that require techs to do both sleep and eeg. I believe that we will see more of this in the future. The END tech shortage is going to become a big deal in July.

jld0104-Sleep has been very good to me. My only regret was that I did not go through the same course as my wife. I will tell you that her education in combination with my experience have opened quite a few doors for the both of us.
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Postby Rocklandish » Mon Jun 13, 2011 5:07 am

[quote="RPSGT88athome"]jld0104,


An AAS END program is good to get you started because the entrance exam requirements for registration in each modality are reduced. That said, and you should be very aware of this point, you will not be proficient in 5 modalities upon graduation. You will likely not even be proficient in one. That's the rub.

My position is it takes two years of full time work while studying on the side to develop a proficient EEG -or- Sleep Technologist. If you want to be good at what you do, choose a modality and stick with it.

If I hire you and determine you are minimally proficient for the task then you will be let go. Within 3 weeks.

Does anyone else see the contradiction here?
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