RPSGT in NC

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Postby RPSGT88athome » Mon Jun 13, 2011 5:38 am

No contradiction Rock. I'm not going to hire someone without:

At least the RPSGT credential and two years of full time sleep experience. RRT/RPSGTs are absolutely welcome.

or

RPSGT and two years in an AAS poly program

or

RPSGT and two years in an END program with heavy sleep training.

If a tech is not proficient after all that then its time to find someone else.

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Postby Rocklandish » Mon Jun 13, 2011 5:42 am

LMAO

You said that a tech would be lucky to be proficient in any modality fresh out of school.

Your making this too easy! :P
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Postby Rocklandish » Mon Jun 13, 2011 5:49 am

Rocklandish wrote:LMAO

You said that a tech would be lucky to be proficient in any modality fresh out of school.

You're making this too easy! :P


Day 6 of looking at the squiggly lines.

88/labman If I could I would gladly work for either of you.
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Postby RPSGT88athome » Mon Jun 13, 2011 5:59 am

Yes I did. END school. Because a student's time is divided over multiple modalities. AAS poly program provides a much better sleep education because the time is not divided. Much greater chance of producing a proficient tech upon graduation.

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Postby Rocklandish » Mon Jun 13, 2011 6:09 am

RPSGT88athome wrote:Yes I did. END school. Because a student's time is divided over multiple modalities. AAS poly program provides a much better sleep education because the time is not divided. Much greater chance of producing a proficient tech upon graduation.

RPSGT88


I have to agree with you there. the END program barely covers the sleep that is on their own exam. Unfortunately the majority of the poly programs are in your neck of the woods. Not everyone has access to any sort of sleep program let alone a good one. This whole topic still boils down to the lack of education in mentors in our field. That is the part that you are missing. You are biased because of your geographic location to the programs. I have to agree with Johnny on this one.
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Postby RPSGT88athome » Mon Jun 13, 2011 6:16 am

Access was not relevant to the OPs question. We have multiple END and PSG programs in NC. How can I be biased if both programs are equally available in my geographic area? And how does my END program graduate background bias me towards PSG programs?

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Postby Rocklandish » Mon Jun 13, 2011 6:41 am

RPSGT88athome wrote:Access was not relevant to the OPs question. We have multiple END and PSG programs in NC. How can I be biased if both programs are equally available in my geographic area? And how does my END program graduate background bias me towards PSG programs?

RPSGT88


Access is relavent based on your answer to the OPs question. Your answer was based on your availability to all of the programs. Not all geographic locations have this type of program availability. You forget that you are blessed to live in an area with great END/sleep programs. The majority of us are on our own or limited to education by chain email. You live in what some of us have come to call the neurodiagnostic triangle.
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Postby tiredjohnny1 » Mon Jun 13, 2011 12:07 pm

You're right Rock, the program matters. All END programs are required to have introductions to all modalities. Some programs try to incorporate that mandate by teaching a little of everything but many are EEG with sleep add-on, primarily teaching EEG with 1 semester of EEG training, 1 semester of PSG training and 1 semester each of EEG and PSG clinicals. The programs design is important but the fact that you have been exposed to and understand the concepts and techniques of all modalities gives you added options.

James views this from his needs as an employer and his direct responsibilities. My needs as an employer are substantially different. Yes we do sleep. But being a neurology based physician practice group we are just as busy with EEG and NCS as we are with sleep. We also do some EP. So a tech with training in multiple modalities is of much greater value than a tech who only knows sleep. I would imagine this is true of most neuro departments in average to large sized hospitals and many neurology practices.

If you are determined to only do sleep, then an AAS program in sleep is perfectly fine. If you want more options in the same amount of time/cost, then do an END program.

What is the most important factor in any of this is individual motivation, ability, and achievement. Two people can take the same training. One might be terrific and one might be average. The graduate from an AAS sleep program might be average and a graduate from an AAS END program might be terrific or vice-versa. The training matters but the person matters more.
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Postby RPSGT88athome » Mon Jun 13, 2011 12:33 pm

I have to agree with you about the person making the difference.

My practice is similar to yours. Neurology based. 8 beds at the main location. EEG runs 4 beds during the day 5 days a week. Another two beds run daytime PSGs and MSLTs/MWTs. Monday-Friday we run 8 beds at night. Sat 4-6 beds. Sunday 6-8 beds. Heavy mix of EEG and Sleep. However, the modalities are kept seperate. EEG techs do EEG. Sleep techs do sleep. NCV techs do NCV. We have one EEG tech that does a rare visual EP. We have another EEG tech registered in Sleep but does not actually work in it. Each tech concentrates on his or her own specific modality and the results are great.

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Postby effacient » Tue Jun 14, 2011 12:15 am

sleepguy wrote:"? is what is the difference in AAS in END and AAS in RPSGT in terms of work enviroment and salary differences??"

Waaaaay too much sputum in RT. Waaaaay too many nuts in Neuro. Nice sleepy folks in Sleep.

You do the math.


I think there are difference in many ways. In environment AAS is more ecofriendly. Salary differences is not much. :D
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Postby Murcielago » Thu Jul 21, 2011 5:32 am

Rocklandish wrote:I know of at least 3 different labs in Co. that require techs to do both sleep and eeg. I believe that we will see more of this in the future. The END tech shortage is going to become a big deal in July.



What happened in July??
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Postby Rocklandish » Thu Jul 21, 2011 6:07 am

Murcielago wrote:
Rocklandish wrote:I know of at least 3 different labs in Co. that require techs to do both sleep and eeg. I believe that we will see more of this in the future. The END tech shortage is going to become a big deal in July.



What happened in July??


There is now an education requirement to do EEGs.
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Postby Murcielago » Thu Jul 28, 2011 3:55 am

you mean an education requirement to become a registered EEG tech?

or did your facility begin to require education for EEG?
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Postby somnus diabolus » Sat Aug 27, 2011 12:48 am

I know multiple people who have done the END program at Pamlico in NC. They had very limited training in sleep in the school. Luckily, one picked our lab for some clinicals, and learned 10x in a few clinicals than she had the entire time in class. Where as my AAS in Polysomnography at Pitt CC had 3 semesters and a summer devoted strictly to Polysomnography. I also had 300 hours of clinicals required. There is no comparison in training to those two programs.
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Postby A New Convert » Wed Aug 31, 2011 7:51 pm

somnus diabolus wrote:I know multiple people who have done the END program at Pamlico in NC. They had very limited training in sleep in the school. Luckily, one picked our lab for some clinicals, and learned 10x in a few clinicals than she had the entire time in class. Where as my AAS in Polysomnography at Pitt CC had 3 semesters and a summer devoted strictly to Polysomnography. I also had 300 hours of clinicals required. There is no comparison in training to those two programs.



So whats your excuse?


I make myself LOL :)
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